LESLIE HOGARTH
Northumberland

I am Les Hogarth, a podiatrist from Bedlington in Northumberland, I now live in Fife, Scotland.  I have managed to find out a little more information on my side of the family.  It looks like I'll have to have a trip to Bothal cemetery in Northumberland to find dates.  Most of the older family members are buried there.

Here is my family tree:

... 2 Matthew Hogarth - Jubilee Brickyard & Quarry, Pegswood.
...... 3 William Hogarth
......... 4 Matthew Hogarth (1891-?)
............ 5 William Hogarth (30 Dec 1922 - 28 Jan 2000)
............... 6 Leslie Hogarth (14 Oct 1952-)
............... 6 Elizabeth Hogarth (29 May 1957-)
............... 6 Anne Hogarth (24 Nov 1966-)
............ 5 Margaret Hogarth (1914-1969)
............ 5 Dorothy Hogarth (1916-1998)
............ 5 John Hogarth (1934-)
......... 4 Albert Hogarth (1892-?)
......... 4 Daisy Hogarth (1893-?)
......... 4 Wilhelmina Hogarth (1894-?)
...... 3 John Hogarth
...... 3 Elizabeth Hogarth
... 2 John Hogarth - Jubilee Brickyard & Quarry, Pegswood.

 

I found the following article amongst my fathers effects.  It appears to be a page from a booklet on the history of Choppington.  The area mentioned for the clay quarries is in Choppington, Wansbeck District, Northumberland.


      "In 1847 John Hogarth is described as a shopkeeper and a mason, 3 years later as a grocer and brick and tile manufacturer.  He appears to have been making bricks from about 1846, but the first definite indication is his renewal of the lease from the landlord the Rev. Geo. Cruddass of a house and land to work the clay there on, it was known then as the tilery field.  On his death in 1881, his widow Jane gave up all claim the plant and fixtures etc., to William Hogarth nephew of her husband who took the lease of the tilery and clay pits.

      By 1887 he was employing 26 hands and producing 1,200,000 bricks per annum.  Ten years later there was a disastrous fire at the works which caused £1,500 worth of damage.  Hogarth abandoned the works and sold out to a Mr Simpson in 1898, the Scotland Gate yard was then known as Simpson's yard.  It continued producing brick and tiles until just before the First World war, apparently the clay pit was exhausted.  The remains of some of the buildings and the offending chimney were removed after the second war.

      Hogarth, on selling the Scotland Gate concern, obtained a lease of land on the freehold of the Windmill Farm and established a new brick manufactury on the east side of the Glebe Lane and immediately south of the railway.  This he named as the Jubilee Yard which dates it as 1898.  It only had a short life as the clay pit advanced eastwards, the only area to work, the clay seam became very thin and the works were abandoned c. 1914.

      Descendants of the Hogarth family worked as skilled brick burners until the Choppington and Sleekburn yards were worked out."
 

   
E-mail Les Hogarth


Go back to the Jigsaw Puzzle index